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Guion S. Bluford
1942 -
American engineer and astronaut, Guion S. Bluford became the first african american in space after completing the STS-8 mission aboard the Challenger in 1983.
A distinguished U.S. Air Force Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) member in college at Pennsylvania State University, Bluford joined the U.S. Air Force and served in the Vietnam War. Flying more than 140 combat missions, he won several medals, including the Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm.
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Guion S. Bluford

1942 -

American engineer and astronaut, Guion S. Bluford became the first african american in space after completing the STS-8 mission aboard the Challenger in 1983.

A distinguished U.S. Air Force Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) member in college at Pennsylvania State University, Bluford joined the U.S. Air Force and served in the Vietnam War. Flying more than 140 combat missions, he won several medals, including the Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm.

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Septima Poinsette Clark
1898 – 1987
American educator and civil rights activist. The mother of the “Civil Rights Movement,” Clark ensured proper literacy amongst African American through extensive, informative workshops.
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Septima Poinsette Clark

1898 – 1987

American educator and civil rights activist. The mother of the “Civil Rights Movement,” Clark ensured proper literacy amongst African American through extensive, informative workshops.

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Kenneth Bancroft Clark 
1914 – 2005
Psychologist and educator, Kenneth Bancroft Clark was the first black president of the American Psychological Association.
Clark was also the first African-American to become a fully tenured professor at the City College of New York. He aided Gunnar Myrdal with his monumental study of America’s racial problems. With his wife Mamie Phipps Clark, in 1946, the couple founded the Northside Center for Child Development to work with ghetto children, and published a report (1950) that unmasked the psychological effects of racial segregation in schools. The report was prominently cited in the 1954 Supreme Court ruling, Brown v. Board of Education, that outlawed segregation nationwide.
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Kenneth Bancroft Clark

1914 – 2005

Psychologist and educator, Kenneth Bancroft Clark was the first black president of the American Psychological Association.

Clark was also the first African-American to become a fully tenured professor at the City College of New York. He aided Gunnar Myrdal with his monumental study of America’s racial problems. With his wife Mamie Phipps Clark, in 1946, the couple founded the Northside Center for Child Development to work with ghetto children, and published a report (1950) that unmasked the psychological effects of racial segregation in schools. The report was prominently cited in the 1954 Supreme Court ruling, Brown v. Board of Education, that outlawed segregation nationwide.

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Clara Brown 
 1800 – 1885
Philanthropist. Pioneer. Born a slave in 1800 in Virginia, she was freed in her 50s. Brown was the first African American woman to make it to Colorado’s gold rush region. Settling in Central City, she made money by running a laundry business and became quite a success. Brown earned enough to buy property and invest in mines.
She helped sixteen other former slaves start a new life in Central City, Colorado. In 1879, Brown traveled to Kansas to help freed slaves who had migrated there to build a community and farm the land.
Before her death in 1885, she was made a member of the Society of Colorado Pioneers for her role in the Colorado gold rush.
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Clara Brown

 1800 – 1885

Philanthropist. Pioneer. Born a slave in 1800 in Virginia, she was freed in her 50s. Brown was the first African American woman to make it to Colorado’s gold rush region. Settling in Central City, she made money by running a laundry business and became quite a success. Brown earned enough to buy property and invest in mines.

She helped sixteen other former slaves start a new life in Central City, Colorado. In 1879, Brown traveled to Kansas to help freed slaves who had migrated there to build a community and farm the land.

Before her death in 1885, she was made a member of the Society of Colorado Pioneers for her role in the Colorado gold rush.

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Otis Boykin
1920 - 1982
Inventor. Engineer. Boykin created electronic control devices for guided missles, IBM computers, and the control unit for a pacemaker.
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Otis Boykin

1920 - 1982

Inventor. Engineer. Boykin created electronic control devices for guided missles, IBM computers, and the control unit for a pacemaker.

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Patricia Bath 
1942 -
This scientist, physician, and inventor is best known for her most well-known invention: the Laserphaco Probe. She was the first African American receive a patent her invention, which creates a less painful and more precise treatment of cataracts. With her invention, Bath was able to help restore the sight of those who had been blind for more than 30 years.
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Patricia Bath

1942 -

This scientist, physician, and inventor is best known for her most well-known invention: the Laserphaco Probe. She was the first African American receive a patent her invention, which creates a less painful and more precise treatment of cataracts. With her invention, Bath was able to help restore the sight of those who had been blind for more than 30 years.

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Marie Daly
1921 - 2003
This pioneering scientist was the first African-American woman to receive a Ph.D. in chemistry, and her groundbreaking work helped clarify how the human body works.
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Marie Daly

1921 - 2003

This pioneering scientist was the first African-American woman to receive a Ph.D. in chemistry, and her groundbreaking work helped clarify how the human body works.

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Rebecca J. Cole (16 March 1846–14 August 1922)
In 1867, Rebecca J. Cole became the second African American woman to receive an M.D. degree in the United States. Dr. Cole was able to overcome racial and gender barriers to medical education by training in all-female institutions run by women who had been part of the first generation of female physicians graduating mid-century.
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Rebecca J. Cole (16 March 1846–14 August 1922)

In 1867, Rebecca J. Cole became the second African American woman to receive an M.D. degree in the United States. Dr. Cole was able to overcome racial and gender barriers to medical education by training in all-female institutions run by women who had been part of the first generation of female physicians graduating mid-century.

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Benjamin Banneker has been called the first African American intellectual. He was born in 1731 in Ellicott’s Mills, Md. 

Self-taught, after studying the inner workings of a friend’s watch, he made one of wood that accurately kept time for more than 40 years. Banneker taught himself astronomy well enough to correctly predict a solar eclipse in 1789. From 1791 to 1802 he published the Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia Almanac and Ephemeris, which contained tide tables, future eclipses, and medicinal formulas. t is believed to be the first scientific book published by an African American. Also a surveyor and mathematician, Banneker was appointed by President George Washington to the District of Columbia Commission, which was responsible for the survey work that established the city’s original boundaries.

When the chairman of the committee, Pierre Charles L’Enfant, suddenly resigned and left, taking the plans with him, Banneker reproduced the plans from memory, saving valuable time. A staunch opponent of slavery, Banneker sent a copy of his first almanac to then-Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson to counter Jefferson’s belief in the intellectual inferiority of blacks.

Benjamin Banneker has been called the first African American intellectual. He was born in 1731 in Ellicott’s Mills, Md. 

Self-taught, after studying the inner workings of a friend’s watch, he made one of wood that accurately kept time for more than 40 years. Banneker taught himself astronomy well enough to correctly predict a solar eclipse in 1789. From 1791 to 1802 he published the Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia Almanac and Ephemeris, which contained tide tables, future eclipses, and medicinal formulas. t is believed to be the first scientific book published by an African American. Also a surveyor and mathematician, Banneker was appointed by President George Washington to the District of Columbia Commission, which was responsible for the survey work that established the city’s original boundaries.

When the chairman of the committee, Pierre Charles L’Enfant, suddenly resigned and left, taking the plans with him, Banneker reproduced the plans from memory, saving valuable time. A staunch opponent of slavery, Banneker sent a copy of his first almanac to then-Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson to counter Jefferson’s belief in the intellectual inferiority of blacks.